(A) Anaphora

Anaphora is a rhetorical device that includes multiple phrases, lines, or sentences that begin with the same word or phrase. The repetition creates a musical effect, and can bind lines together in a memorable way.

Excerpt from Song of Myself by Walt Whitman:

Ever the hard unsunk ground,
Ever the eaters and drinkers, ever the upward and downward sun, ever the air and the ceaseless tides,
Ever myself and my neighbors, refreshing, wicked, real,
Ever the old inexplicable query, ever that thorn’d thumb, that breath of itches and thirsts,
Ever the vexer’s hoot! hoot! till we find where the sly one hides and bring him forth,
Ever love, ever the sobbing liquid of life,
Ever the bandage under the chin, ever the trestles of death.

Read more about anaphora at the Poetry Foundation.

Find out more about poetry a to z.

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